CHICAGO, ILLINOIS-- El centro de eventos McCormick Place se tornó un auténtico manicomio al celebrar la reelección de Barack Obama como el 44to presidente de Estados Unidos la noche del "súper martes" electoral, quien prometió, entre otras cosas, trabajar con ambos partidos en "arreglar" el sistema migratorio.

Antecedido por gritos de "¡Cuatro años más!", el presidente llegó al podio acompañado de su esposa Michelle y sus hijas Sasha y Malia. Luego de unos instantes ellas dejaron el escenario y el presidente dio su discurso de aceptación.

Treinta y cinto minutos después de la medianoche, el mandatario se dirigió a unos 3 mil simpatizantes, que incluían a voluntarios de campaña y familiares, que aborrotaron el Lake Center, uno de los salones del enorme McCormick Place.

"Ustedes saben que lo mejor está por venir", dijo Obama. "Hicimos historia juntos".

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  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama watches as first lady Michelle Obama gives a thumbs up at his election night party Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. President Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Jill Biden Joe Biden

    President Barack Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and Jill Biden acknowledge the crowd at his election night party Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. President Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

  • President Barack Obama , joined by his wife Michelle, Vice President Joe Biden and his spouse Jill acknowledge applause after Obama delivered his victory speech to supporters gathered in Chicago early Wednesday Nov. 7 2012. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama waves to his supporters after his speech at his election night party Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. President Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. At right is Vice President Joe Biden. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Joe Biden, Jill Biden

    Vice President Joe Biden and his wife Jill Biden wave to the supporters after President Barack Obama's speech at his election night party Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Chicago. President Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • President Obama Holds Election Night Event In Chicago

    CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06: U.S. President Barack Obama walks on stage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia to deliver his victory speech on election night at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

  • President Obama Holds Election Night Event In Chicago

    CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06: U.S. President Barack Obama walks out on stage to deliver his victory speech on election night at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • President Obama Holds Election Night Event In Chicago

    CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 06: U.S. President Barack Obama walks on stage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia to deliver his victory speech on election night at McCormick Place November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama won reelection against Republican candidate, former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

  • Mitt Romney

    Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney arrives to his election night rally, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in Boston. President Obama defeated Republican challenger former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

  • Japanese high-school students celebrate reports that President Barack Obama won the U.S. presidential election at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. (AP Photo/Itsuo Inouye)

  • Kelly Rodgers, 18, of Philadelphia, holds a sign saying "We Will Barack You" as people celebrate outside of the White House after President Barack Obama won re-election against Mitt Romney in the presidential election on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

  • People react after they learn President Obama has won at Democratic headquarters in Portland, Ore., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012.(AP Photo/Don Ryan)

  • Supporters react as the watch televised reports projecting President Obama as the winner during a Democratic Party election party, Tuesday Nov. 6, 2012, in Salt Lake City, Utah. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Trent Nelson) LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT; DESERET NEWS OUT

  • Obama 2012

    President Barack Obama supporters celebrate televised reports of his projected re-election for president of the United States during a rally at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore, Md., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

  • A supporter of President Barack Obama reacts to positive predictions for her candidate as crowds watch election results in Times Square, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in New York. After a year of campaigning, polls have begun to close after Americans across the United States headed to the polls to decide the winner of the tight presidential race between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Barack Obama

    Supporters cheer as a network projects the re-election of President Barack Obama at his election night party Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)

  • Barack Obama

    A supporter reacts to election results at the election night party for President Barack Obama Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

  • US-VOTE-2012-ELECTION-OBAMA

    Supporters of US President Barack Obama react to results on election night November 6, 2012 in Chicago, Illinois. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Cean Orrett, 45, center, and Gareth Edmondson-Jones, 46, of San Diago, both recently married in New York, react to positive predictions for President Barack Obama as crowds watch election results in Times Square, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in New York. After a year of campaigning, polls have begun to close after Americans across the United States headed to the polls to decide the winner of the tight presidential race between President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • ITALY-US-VOTE-2012

    A supporter of US President Barack Obama attends the US election night party in Milan on November 7, 2012 . AFP PHOTO / GIUSEPPE CACACE (Photo credit should read GIUSEPPE CACACE/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Guests look at early projections for votes for the President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney during the Presidential Election party at the U.S. Embassy in London, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

  • Voters wait in line near the Irondale Senior Citizens' Center, near Birmingham, Ala., Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Even though polls had closed for the 2012 general election, nearly 1,000 stood in a line that wrapped around nearby streets to cast their ballot. (AP Photo/The Birmingham News, Tamika Moore) MAGS OUT

  • Poll workers Eva Prenga, right, Roxanne Blancero, center, and Carole Sevchuk try to start an optical scanner voting machine in the cold and dark at a polling station in a tent in the Midland Beach section of Staten Island, New York, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. The original polling site, a school, was damaged by Superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Voters cast their ballots at a polling place inside St. Leo's Catholic Church in Baltimore on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

  • Voters pack the South Starkvile Voting Precinct trying to get their vote in before heading to work on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Starkville, Miss. (AP Photo/Kerry Smith)

  • Panika Dillion makes calls to potential voters while volunteering at the Travis County Democratic Party Coordinated Campaign Headquarters on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Tamir Kalifa)

  • Voters leave a polling place on election day on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Nashville, Tenn. After a grinding presidential campaign President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, yield center stage to American voters Tuesday for an Election Day choice that will frame the contours of government and the nation for years to come. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

  • Voters line up to cast ballots in the general election at Barrow County's Precinct 16 at Bethlehem Christian Academy, Tuesday morning, Nov. 6, 2012, in Bethlehem, Ga. (AP Photo/David Tulis)

  • President Barack Obama buttons at the Obama field office located on Wyoming Avenue in Scranton, Pa., on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 during Election Day. (AP Photo/Scranton Times & Tribune, Butch Comegys) WILKES BARRE TIMES-LEADER OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

  • Voters wait in line to cast their ballots under a tent at a consolidated polling station for residents of the Rockaways on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • Victor "Snake Mann" Wolder, marks his choices while voting during Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

  • Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or "sovereign free association," a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

  • People walk with a dog toward the main entrance of a polling place at a Hoboken Fire Department firehouse on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • A line forms outside a polling place as people gather to vote on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

  • Classical studies major Omar Dyette, from Racine, Wis., front right, mans a table outside the polls on the campus of Oberlin College in Oberlin, Ohio on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Dyette volunteered with the Ohio Public Interest Research Group to register college students prior to the 2012 election. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan)

  • Noelle Connor

    Noelle Connor, a Madison, Miss., poll worker readies a sticker to apply to the lapel of finished voters at her precinct Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Local officials expressed their pleasure with the large early turnout of voters. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

  • Susan Mardas celebrates Election Day by wearing a festive hat Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, while waiting for her mother to vote in Scarborough, Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

  • People cast their votes at the Suder Elementary School voting precinct in Jonesboro, Ga. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Kent D. Johnson) MARIETTA DAILY OUT; GWINNETT DAILY POST OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; WXIA-TV OUT; WGCL-TV OUT

  • VIRGINIA VOTE

    Voters wait on line on Election Day at the Amtrak waiting room at Main St. Station in Richmond, Va Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown).

  • Amy Kobuchar

    U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar, D Minn., right, stands in line waiting to vote at Marcy School, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Andy King)

  • Voters wait in line at a polling place located inside a shopping mall on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in Austin, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

  • Addey Munye

    Addey Munye, 67, shows off her "I Voted" sticker after she cast her ballot in her first election at a polling station in the West Acres Mall in Fargo, N.D, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Munye is originally from Somalia. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

  • Voters wait to cast a ballot at P.S. 33 in the Chelsea neighborhood of Manhattan, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in New York. Voting in a the U.S. presidential election was the latest challenge for the hundreds of thousands of people in the New York-New Jersey area still affected by Superstorm Sandy, as they struggled to get to non-damaged polling places to cast their ballots in one of the tightest elections in recent history. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Voters wait in line to cast their ballots at a polling station in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or sovereign free association, a designation that would give more autonomy. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

  • Voters check in and cast their ballots under a tent at a consolidated polling station for residents of the Rockaways on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in the Queens borough of New York. Voting in the U.S. presidential election was the latest challenge for the hundreds of thousands of people in the New York-New Jersey area still affected by Superstorm Sandy, as they struggled to get to non-damaged polling places to cast their ballots in one of the tightest elections in recent history. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)



"Vuelvo a la Casa Blanca más inspirado que nunca [...] para reunirme con los líderes de ambos partidos para arreglar la economía, el déficit fiscal, arreglar el sistema de inmigración", dijo el mandatario.

Agradeció a quienes votaron por primera vez: "Ustedes hicieron oír su voz".

También agradeció a su rival republicano, con quien reconoció tuvo una feroz contienda. "He hablado con el gobernador Mitt Romney sobre las maneras en que podemos trabajar juntos", dijo.

Igualmente, reconoció la labor de su esposa de hace 20 años, de quien, dijo, no sería el mismo sin ella. "Déjenme decir esto públicamente: Michelle, nunca te he amado tanto. Este país se ha enamorado de ti".

En tanto, en la sala de prensa, cada estado ganado por Obama era celebrado con aplausos por algunos miembros de los medios estadounidenses.

Pero en el Lake Center ese entusiasmo se desbordaba en un rugir ensordecedor cada vez que las pantallas gigantes de ese salón anunciaban cómo se gestaba la reelección del presidente.

Mientras esperaba al mandatario, quien estaba en un hotel cercano con su familia siguiendo los resultados, según reportes de prensa, la concurrencia cantaba a coro el éxito de The Supremes "Can't Hurry Love", una de las tantas canciones que se tocaron, de artistas como Michael Jackson, Ray Charles y Ottis Reddin.

El alcalde de Chicago, Rahm Emanuel, llegó partiendo plaza. Los medios asediaron al exjefe de Gabinete de la Casa Blanca cual estrella de rock.

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Paralelamente, en las afueras del gigantesco centro de eventos, cientos de manifestantes hicieron una vigilia tras recorrer cerca de una milla desde el Barrio Chino hasta McCormick Place para exigir una reforma migratoria y recordarle al presidente Obama la importancia del voto latino.

La manifestación fue organizada por la Coalición de Derechos de Inmigrantes y Refugiados de Illinois, que felicitó a Obama por su victoria y le recordó la deuda pendiente que tiene con la comunidad inmigrante.

"Necesitamos una reforma migratoria que mantenga unidas a las familias y que restaure la unidad familiar como el principio central en todos los aspectos de nuestro sistema de inmigración al tiempo que proteja a los trabajadores y los derechos civiles de los inmigrantes en nuestras comunidades", dijo Lawrence Benito, CEO de ICIRR, en un comunicado.

Este miércoles ICIRR tiene programado un encuentro con los medios para dar a conocer el impacto de su campaña de nuevos votantes en el estado.

La organización no partidista, que aglutina a 130 grupos proinmigrantes, registró este año a 26,498 nuevos votantes latinos e inmigrantes en Illinois. La cifra es la mayor lograda desde que ICIRR inició estas campañas en 2004.

El congresista por Illinois, Luis Gutiérrez, quien ha impulsado una reforma migratoria integral y que se enfilaba hacia su décima reelección cómodamente, se unirá a ICIRR en la conferencia de prensa.