Agencias de gobierno y compañías de medios de comunicación como Google están difundiendo información en español por internet y por celular para mantener informados a los hispanos sobre los servicios disponibles ante el paso de Sandy y la falta de electricidad.

Google Crisis Response lanzó enlaces con información en español de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA), con el fin de mantener informada a la comunidad hispana sobre los estragos del fenómeno natural en el noreste el país.

El buscador categorizó el enlace de FEMA de preparación para huracán en español, junto al mapa de Google Crisis Response en inglés que se despliega en el buscador de manera automática y en las primeras líneas en el resultado de la búsqueda de la palabra "Sandy".

Google Crisis Responde difunde información inmediata y en tiempo real sobre todas las agencias de los tres niveles de gobierno involucradas en la recuperación del paso del fenómeno meteorológico.

Google también tradujo al español los títulos de los enlaces en inglés que se encuentran esta página como ubicaciones, pronósticos, zonas de evacuación, alertas y transito.

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  • John Hardy Liam Hardy

    John Hardy, left, and his son, Liam, 13, visit the charred remains of his wife's parents home in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough of New York, Friday, Nov. 23, 2012. A fire destroyed more than 100 homes in the oceanfront community during Superstorm Sandy.(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, a burned bicycle lies in the ashes of a burned out home in the Breezy Point section of the Queens borough of New York. More than 50 homes were lost in a fire that swept through the oceanside community during Superstorm Sandy. Some residents of New York City's storm-battered Breezy Point neighborhood say thieves looted their damaged houses over Thanksgiving. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

  • Snow Showers Add To Misery For Areas Hit Hard By Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 27: A swimming pool is cleared of sand in the heavily damaged Rockaway neighborhood on November 27, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. The state of New York has said that Superstorm Sandy has cost upwards of $42 billion. This price, for which congressional leaders will make requests for federal disaster aid to help pay, includes $32 billion for repairs and restoration. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

  • A man walks past destroyed homes on the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, New York, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Officials say New York City's free repair program for storm-damaged homes has fixed up about 50 homes so far, while still just gearing up. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Men shovel out a pool filled with mud on the Rockaway Peninsula in Queens, New York, Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012. Governor Andrew Cuomo wants huge electrical transformers hauled to upper floors of commercial buildings and the ability to shutter subways as part of a $9 billion plan to protect New York City from the next superstorm. Cuomo said Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012, that government must take preventive measures now to avoid future loss of life and billions more in damage. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • People wait to use a pay phone on Bright Beach Avenue, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. People in the coastal corridor battered by superstorm Sandy took the first cautious steps Wednesday to reclaim routines upended by the disaster, even as rescuers combed neighborhoods strewn with debris and scarred by floods and fire. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Commuters cross New York's Brooklyn Bridge, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. The floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • A line of ticket-buyers wait at the TKTS booth, which sells discount tickets to Broadway shows, in New York's Times Square on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Most Broadway theaters were reopening Wednesday for regular matinee and evening performances following several days of closures related to superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz)

  • Workers try to clear boats and debris from the New Jersey Transit Morgan draw bridge Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in South Amboy, N.J., after Monday's storm surge from Sandy pushed boats and cargo containers onto the train tracks. New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line, which provides train service from the New Jersey shore towns to New York City, may experience prolonged disruption. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • This photo provided by Metropolitan Transportation Authority shows people boarding a bus, as partial bus service was restored on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Mass transit, including buses, was suspended during Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Patrick Cashin)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    People wait in line to fill containers with fuel at a Shell gas station October 30, 2012 in Edison, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy which hit New York and New Jersey left much of Bergen County flooded and without power. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Ryan Fitzgerald, Connie Boorer, Debbie Baker-Star

    Ryan Fitzgerald, center, of the Toms River Police Department, helps Connie Boorer, left, get into a bus to head to a shelter while bus driver Debbie Baker-Star, right, carries Boorer's walker as officials helped stranded citizens out of their flooded homes a day after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Toms River, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • US-WEATHER-STORM-SANDY

    People leave a home on a flooded street October 30, 2012 in Little Ferry, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy which hit New York and New Jersey left much of Bergen County flooded and without power. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

  • People look across the East River from Brooklyn into lower Manhattan, where some buildings were operating with emergency backup generators, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in New York. Much of lower Manhattan is without electric power following the impact of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

  • Houses are surrounded by floodwaters in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Little Ferry, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Homes destroyed by a fire at Breezy Point are shown, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Sand and debris cover a part of town near the ocean in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm which was downgraded from a hurricane just before making landfall, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Residents assess damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Cars are submerged at the entrance to a parking garage in New York's Financial District in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)

  • A man uses his mobile phone to photograph a closed and flooded subway station in lower Manhattan, in New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Due to superstorm Sandy, New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • Kim Johnson looks over the destruction near her seaside apartment in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Waves driven by superstorm Sandy crash on the beach of Lake Ontario in Toronto on Tuesday morning, Oct. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Frank Gunn)

  • A man photographs a home damaged during a storm at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • A boat lies toppled between two flooded houses in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

  • A street sign is partially buried in sand Tuesday morning, Oct. 30, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and across Beach Avenue. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • A tree worker directs a crane in Toronto on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 lifting parts of a tree felled by superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Frank Gunn)

  • Large stretches of boardwalk were destroyed by Storm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in in the New York City borough of Queen. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • Water reaches the street level of the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

  • Water reaches the street level of the flooded Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Superstorm Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Louis Lanzano)

  • Water reaches the street level of the flooded Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)

  • Vehicles are submerged on 14th Street near the Consolidated Edison power plant, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • A vehicle is submerged on 14th Street near the Consolidated Edison power plant, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy knocked out power to at least 3.1 million people, and New York's main utility said large sections of Manhattan had been plunged into darkness by the storm, with 250,000 customers without power as water pressed into the island from three sides, flooding rail yards, subway tracks, tunnels and roads. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • This photo provided by Dylan Patrick shows flooding along the Westside Highway near the USS Intrepid as Sandy moves through the area Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in New York. Much of New York was plunged into darkness Monday by a superstorm that overflowed the city's historic waterfront, flooded the financial district and subway tunnels and cut power to nearly a million people. (AP Photo/Dylan Patrick) MANDATORY CREDIT: DYLAN PATRICK

  • The New York skyline remains dark Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from the Williamsburg neighborhood in the Brooklyn borough of New York. In an attempt to lessen damage from saltwater to the subway system and the electrical network beneath the city's financial district, New York City's main utility cut power to about 6,500 customers in lower Manhattan. But a far wider swath of the city was hit with blackouts caused by flooding and transformer explosions. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • This combination of photos shows above, lower Manhattan dark after the hybrid storm Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, and below a fully lit skyline on Jan. 6, 2012, both seen from the Brooklyn borough of New York. In an attempt to lessen damage from saltwater to the subway system and the electrical network beneath the city's financial district, New York City's main utility cut power to about 6,500 customers in lower Manhattan. But a far wider swath of the city was hit with blackouts caused by flooding and transformer explosions. (AP Photo)

  • Vehicles are submerged during a storm surge near the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Superstorm Sandy zeroed in on New York's waterfront with fierce rain and winds that shuttered most of the nation's largest city Monday, darkened the financial district and left a huge crane hanging off a luxury high-rise. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Sea water floods the entrance to the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Streets are flooded under the Manhattan Bridge in the Dumbo section of Brooklyn, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • A vehicle is submerged on 14th Street near the Consolidated Edison power plant, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy knocked out power to at least 3.1 million people, and New York's main utility said large sections of Manhattan had been plunged into darkness by the storm, with 250,000 customers without power as water pressed into the island from three sides, flooding rail yards, subway tracks, tunnels and roads. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • Lights from a NYPD police vehicle illuminate a downed tree on 6th Avenue, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)

  • In this photo provided by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey a surveillance camera captures the PATH station in Hoboken, N.J., as it is flooded shortly before 9:30 p.m. EDT on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Port Authority of New York and New Jersey)

  • FDNY inflatable boats travel along 14th street towards the East River on a rescue mission in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)

  • Mid Atlantic Coast Prepares For Hurricane Sandy

    ATLANTIC CITY, NJ - OCTOBER 29: A flooded street is seen at nightfall during rains from Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Sandy made landfall over Southern New Jersey today. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

  • Mid Atlantic Coast Prepares For Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 29: Flooded cars, caused by Hurricane Sandy, are seen on October 29, 2012, in the Financial District of New York, United States. Hurricane Sandy, which threatens 50 million people in the eastern third of the U.S., is expected to bring days of rain, high winds and possibly heavy snow. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the closure of all New York City will bus, subway and commuter rail service as of Sunday evening (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • Mid Atlantic Coast Prepares For Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 29: Police officers and fire fighters guard a scaffolding in the process of collapsing due to Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 in New York City. The storm, which threatens 50 million people in the eastern third of the U.S., is expected to bring days of rain, high winds and possibly heavy snow. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the closure of all New York City bus, subway and commuter rail service as of Sunday evening. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • Mid Atlantic Coast Prepares For Hurricane Sandy

    NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 29: Flooded cars, caused by Hurricane Sandy, are seen on October 29, 2012, in the Financial District of New York, United States. Hurricane Sandy, which threatens 50 million people in the eastern third of the U.S., is expected to bring days of rain, high winds and possibly heavy snow. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the closure of all New York City will bus, subway and commuter rail service as of Sunday evening (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • Hurricane Sandy Bears Down On U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastline

    CAPE MAY, NJ - OCTOBER 29: Ocean Avenue is flooded caused by Hurricane Sandy, on October 29, 2012 in Cape May, The New Jersey coastline is feeling the full force of Sandy's heavy winds and record floodwaters. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

  • Hurricane Sandy Bears Down On U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastline

    BENSALEM, PA - OCTOBER 29: A PennDOT truck slowly rides on the Pennsylvania Turnpike as Hurricane Sandy approaches October 29, 2012 in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter ordered that all city offices be closed Monday and Tuesday due to potential damage from Hurricane Sandy. Public transit will remain shut down as well.(Photo by William Thomas Cain/Getty Images)

  • Hurricane Sandy Bears Down On U.S. Mid-Atlantic Coastline

    ASBURY PARK, NJ - OCTOBER 29: An Asbury Park police officer patrols the streets during Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012 in Asbury Park, New Jersey. The storm, which threatens 50 million people in the eastern third of the U.S., is expected to bring days of rain, high winds and possibly heavy snow. (Photo by Michael Loccisano/Getty Images)

Asimismo, la agencia federal FEMA abrió desde hace dos días su cuenta de Twiter en español @FEMAespanol para mantener informada a la comunidad hispana en donde alerta que los interesados pueden accesar a las actualizaciones a través de su teléfono móvil.

Tanto FEMA como la Cruz Roja Americana son algunas de las agencias estadounidenses que permiten que los usuarios reciban el servicio de alertas sin tener que darse de alta como usuarios de Twiter sino solamente enviando en mensaje de texto indicado en el blog oficial de la agencia gubernamental. Sin embargo, sólo FEMA ofrece este servicio en español.

La Cruz Roja Americana por su parte está difundiendo su página de internet en español titulada "Sano y Salvo", donde los usuarios pueden ingresar sus datos para dar a conocer a sus familiares que se encuentran bien después del paso de Sandy.

Muchos sin embargo, no tienen acceso ni al internet ni a su celular por la falta del servicio eléctrico. Es por eso que la empresa Florida Power & Light FPL en Miami envió un total de 865 trabajadores y unos 250 camiones para ayudar en las labores de restablecimiento de la electricidad en el noreste del país. La Cruz Roja Americana en el Sur de Florida también está movilizando a mil 300 trabajadores al área del desastre.

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  • Huracán Sandy - Octubre de 2012

    Es uno de los peores huracanes que han azotado a los Estados Unidos. Aunque aún no se han calculado los daños, expertos señalan que los daños podrían tener un valor de entre 30.000 y 50.000 millones de dólares, es probablemente una de los "10 ó 15 tormentas más devastadoras" que ha sufrido Estados Unidos. Así lo atestiguan los especialistas de Eqecat, el centro de estudios especializado en la gestión de riesgos (<a href="http://www.elmundo.es/america/2012/10/30/estados_unidos/1351619982.html?cid=GNEW970103">El Mundo España</a>) Las afectaciones en el proceso electoral, <a href="http://mexico.cnn.com/opinion/2012/10/29/opinion-como-impactara-el-huracan-sandy-en-las-elecciones-de-eu">según CNN</a>, son mayúsculas.

  • Huracán Gustav - Morgan City, LA - 2008

    Hurricane Gustav ravaged portions of the Caribbean in late August 2008, resulting in deadly flooding over Haiti and then crossing western Cuba on the 30th as a strong Category Four, with 150 mph winds. A day after emerging into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico, Gustav leveled off as a Category Three. The hurricane remained at that intensity as it approached the coast of Southern Louisiana, prompting the largest evacuation in the state's history on fears of another Katrina-type disaster. Throughout the evening of August 31st, drier air began to work its way into the system and Gustav responded by weakening slightly to Category Two intensity. Just prior to, and during, landfall Gustav began a trend of increasing organization with intense convection developing within the northwest and western eyewall. The hurricane made landfall near Cocodrie, Louisiana on September 1st at 14:30UTC with sustained winds of 110mph and a central pressure of 955mb. Storm chasers Michael Laca, Jim Leonard and Max Hagen, as well as filmmaker Chris Terrill, intercepted Hurricane Gustav in Morgan City, Louisiana. Our chase team recorded a minimum pressure of 957.3mb at 17:26UTC and estimated peak winds at our location between 80-100mph. An unofficial observation of 103mph was reported by another chase team in Morgan City. Official wind readings include 86mph at Grand Isle; 82mph at Amerda Pass; 75mph at New Iberia; and 91mph at Baton Rouge. After intercepting Gustav's eyewall and eye in Morgan City <b>...</b> Historia de los huracanaes en <a href="http://www.rincondelvago.com/informacion/huracanes/los-peores-huracanes-de-la-historia">RinconDelVago.com</a>.

  • Huracan Katrina

    El huracán Katrina fue el más destructivo y el que causó más víctimas mortales de la temporada de huracanes en el Atlántico de 2005. Se trata del huracán que ha provocado más daños económicos, así como uno de los cinco huracanes más mortíferos, de la historia de Estados Unidos. Asimismo, el Katrina es el sexto más intenso de todos los huracanes del Atlántico registrados. Al menos 1833 personas fallecieron debido al propio huracán o las consiguientes inundaciones, convirtiéndose en el huracán más mortífero en Estados Unidos desde el huracán San Felipe II, de 1928; la cifra total de daños materiales se estimó en un principio en 108 mil millones de dólares (2005 USD),3 casi el cuádruple que la de los desperfectos causados por el huracán Andrew en 1992. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_Katrina">Más información en Wikipedia</a>)

  • Huracán Irene - 2011

    El huracán Irene fue un huracán categoría 2 del tipo Cabo Verde que azotó la costa este de los Estados Unidos en agosto de 2005 y también en 2011 en la costa este. En 2005, Irene fue la novena tormenta tropical a la que se le puso nombre en la temporada 2005 y el cuarto huracán de la misma. Se formó cerca de Cabo Verde el 4 de agosto, atravesó el Atlántico y se movió hacia el norte hasta llegar a las cercanías de las Islas Bermudas antes de convertirse en un ciclón extratropical cuando estaba cerca de la isla de Terranova. Irene persistió durante 14 días como sistema tropical y fue la tormenta de mayor duración de la temporada. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_Irene_%282005%29">Más información en Wikipedia</a>)

  • Huracan Andrew

    Hace 20 anos el huracán Andrew golpeó el sur de la Florida, pese a las ordenes de evacuación, sumada a una ignorancia total del poder de estos fenómenos, decidimos quedarnos para experimentar lo que podía hacer un huracán... (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_Andrew">Más información en Wikipedia</a>)

  • Huracan Mitch, Honduras Nunca Lo Olvidará...

    Una Década Después De Este Siniestro Quiero Rendir Homenaje A Las Victimas De Esta Catástrofe Con Un Pequeño Documental Acerca De Aquel Ida Cuando Honduras Casi Desapareció Del Mapa...Un Minuto De Silencio Por Aquellas Victimas En Este Octubre...

  • Hurricane Alex (Norte de Mexico y costas de Texas, Estados Unidos)

    El Huracán Alex fue la primera tormenta en recibir nombre, el primer huracán, y el primer huracán mayor de la Temporada de huracanes en el Atlántico de 2004. Alex, la primera tormenta de la temporada, se formó excepcionalmente tarde en la temporada; la quinta más tardía desde 1954. Se desarrolló de la interacción entre una borrasca de nivel superior y una depresión con superficie débil el 31 de julio al este de Jacksonville, Florida. Se desplazó al noreste, y se fortaleció hasta alcanzar vientos de 160 km/h antes de pasar a 16 km de la costa de las Outer Banks. Alex tomó aún más fuerza alcanzando una cifra máxima de vientos a 190 km/h mientras se encontraba cerca de las costas de Nueva Inglaterra, siendo el segundo huracán en alcanzar la categoría 3 al norte de 38º N. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_Alex_%282004%29">Más información en Wikipedia</a>)

  • Huracán Gilbert - 1998

    El huracán Gilbert fue un increíblemente intenso y devastador huracán que azotó Jamaica, las Islas Caimán, Mexico y Texas, en septiembre de 1988. Gilbert es el segundo huracán más intenso jamás observado en la cuenca del Atlántico. El 3 de septiembre, una onda tropical surgido frente a la costa occidental de África. Al 8 de septiembre, una depresión tropical formada aproximadamente 400 millas al este de Barbados. El sistema fortalecido rápidamente, alcanzando fuerza de tormenta tropical en 9 de septiembre. Gilbert pasa a través de las Islas de Barlovento que la noche, resultando en poco daño. Gilbert continuo fortalecimiento durante el Mar Caribe, convirtiéndose en un huracán en la noche del 10 y un huracán al día siguiente. Persistentemente en movimiento al oeste-noroeste, Gilbert pasado directamente sobre Jamaica el 12, con vientos sostenidos de 125 mph. Fue el primer huracán de hacer tierra en directo desde Jamaica el huracán Charlie en 1951. Después de salir de Jamaica, Gilbert comenzó una fase de intensificación extrema en el Caribe occidental, alcanzando la categoría cinco, mientras que la intensidad de pasar al sur de las Islas Caimán. Gran Caimán informó de una ráfaga de 156 mph. Para intensificar Continuar, Gilbert alcanzó su punto álgido, en la tarde del 13, con vientos sostenidos de 185 mph y una presión central mínima de 888 mb (26.22 in). Este valor fue el más bajo jamás registrado de presión en el hemisferio occidental, superado hasta por el huracán Wilma en 2005. Gilbert llegó a tierra cerca de Cancún en Mexico de la Península de Yucatán el 14, con vientos de 175 mph. Gilbert sigue siendo un gran huracán que cruzó el Yucatán y el sur del Golfo de Mexico, haciendo un final de tierra cerca de La Pesca, Mexico, el 16. El día 17, un debilitamiento Gilbert azotó el interior de la ciudad de Monterrey, Mexico causando enormes inundaciones. Gilbert finalmente se fusionó con una delantera frontera el 19 de septiembre. Gilbert reivindicada 318 vidas, principalmente en Mexico. Daños cifras exactas no se conocen, pero el total se estima en cerca de 5 mil millones de dólares (1988 USD), $ 9 mil millones (2005 USD). (<a href="http://www.huracanesyucatan.com/foro/index.php?topic=100.45;wap2">Información</a>)

  • Huracan Dolly (Allen)

    El huracán Allen (Dolly) fue el primero y el más fuerte de los huracanes de la temporada de 1980. Fue uno de los huracanes más fuertes en la historia, uno de los que llegó a categoría 5 en la Escala de huracanes de Saffir-Simpson en tres ocasiones distintas, y pasó más tiempo en la categoría 5 que cualquier otro huracán en el Atlántico. Allen es el segundo, de los dos huracanes registrados a lo largo de la historia en la cuenca del Atlántico, en alcanzar vientos sostenidos de 305 km/h (189,52 mph), después del Huracán Camille en 1969. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_Allen">Más información en Wikipedia</a>)

  • Galveston

    El huracán de Galveston de 1915 fue un mortal huracán que golpeó las Islas de Barlovento, La Española, Cuba, Jamaica y el Sur central de Estados Unidos a mediados de agosto del año 1915. Quince años después del devastador huracán de 1900, Galveston fue golpeada por olas de 6,4 m1 que fueron atenuadas por el flamante rompeolas, pero que cambiaron la conformación de la costa. El 17 de agosto, 91,5 m de playa se erosionaron al punto de transformarse en una barra arenosa alejada de la costa, que luego se rellenaría, pero sin volver a su estructura original.1 El ciclón de 1915 causó gran destrucción a su paso, dejando entre 275 y 400 muertes y US$50 millones (de 1915, US$ 1.000 millones de 2010) de daños. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_de_Galveston_%281900%29">Galveston 1900</a>, <a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurac%C3%A1n_de_Galveston_%281915%29">Galveston 1915</a>)

  • Gran huracán de Nueva Inglaterra de 1938

    El gran huracán de Nueva Inglaterra de 1938 fue el primer gran huracán devastador en Nueva Inglaterra desde 1869. La tormenta se formó cerca de la costa de África, en septiembre de 1938 durante la temporada de huracanes del Atlántico de 1938, convirtiéndose en un huracán de la categoría 5 en la escala de huracanes antes de tocar tierra como un huracán categoría 3 en Long Island el 21 de septiembre. El huracán mató a más de 682 personas, más de 57,000 hogares fueron dañados o destruidos, y causó pérdidas de bienes estimados en 4,7 mil millones de dólares. (<a href="http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gran_Hurac%C3%A1n_de_Nueva_Inglaterra_de_1938">Más información en Wikipedia</a>) FFC91 NEW YORK THE WONDER CITY 1938 www.MyFootage.com

Por su parte compañías aerolíneas están difundiendo información en español sobre los vuelos cancelados a consecuencia de este fenómeno. Familiares de miles de personas en el noreste del país están en busca de pasajeros que se quedaron varados en distintos aeropuertos como el de Miami, donde se cancelaron decenas de vuelos.

María Elena Levrant, vocera del aeropuerto internacional de Miami dijo al HuffPost Voces que hasta este momento se han cancelado 62 vuelos que arribarían a esta ciudad mientras 48 más que despegarían.

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